Stamp Duty Calculator

The amount of stamp duty you’ll have to pay depends on a range of factors.

Use our simple calculator to work out how much you’ll owe, depending on the home you’re buying and your circumstances.


What is stamp duty?

Stamp duty land tax (SDLT) is a tax that you may need to pay when you buy a property in England or Northern Ireland. In Scotland there’s a similar tax called land and buildings transaction tax and in Wales it’s called transaction tax.


If you’re buying a residential property, the amount of stamp duty you owe depends on the price you pay for the property and if you’re:

  • A first-time buyer.
  • Moving home.
  • Buying a buy-to-let, a holiday home or a second home.
Stamp duty rates for 2020/2021

Under the current system in England and Northern Ireland, stamp duty is tiered. This means you pay different rates of stamp duty on different portions of the overall purchase price.

This means that if you buy a property for under £125,000 you won’t owe any stamp duty.

The stamp duty tiers are:
Infographic - Stamp duty tax tiers compared with additional property rates
The stamp duty tiers are:
Infographic - Stamp duty tax tiers compared with additional property rates
Stamp duty rate Additional property rate*

*Properties under £40,000 are not subject to the additional stamp duty land tax (SDLT) rates

If you buy a property for £350,000, for example, stamp duty will be calculated like this:

Property price:
£350,000

Portion 1
(£0-£125,000)
0% tax so stamp duty =
£
0

Portion 2
(£125,000.01-£250,000)
2% tax so stamp duty =
£
2,500

Portion 3
(£250,000.01-£350,000)
5% tax so stamp duty =
£
5,000

Total stamp duty owed = £0 + £2,500 + £5,000 = £7,500


Use our stamp duty calculator to see how much stamp duty you'll need to pay.

Stamp Duty Calculator

How much is first-time buyer stamp duty?


If you’re a first-time buyer, you don’t have to pay stamp duty at all if you pay less than £300,000 for your home. And, if you buy a property for between £300,001 and £500,000, you don't have to pay stamp duty on the first £300,000 – just 5% on the amount over that.

To help first-time buyers in London, and other areas where property prices are high, extra stamp duty relief is available for properties up to £500,000. If you’re buying your first home for more than £500,000, however, you won’t qualify for reduced stamp duty rates.

If you’re a first-time buyer buying a shared ownership property valued at up to £500,000, you won’t need to pay any stamp duty. But if the property is worth more than that you’ll have to pay standard stamp duty rates – even if the portion of your home that you own is worth less than £500,000.

To qualify as a first-time buyer and get stamp duty tax relief, you must never have owned or had an interest in a residential property anywhere in the world. This means you must not have bought, inherited or received as a gift either a full property or shares in one. So if, for example, you inherited your grandad’s villa in France with your brother and sold it straightaway, you still wouldn’t be considered a first-time buyer. You’re also not seen as a first-time buyer if you intend to let out the first property you buy.

Stamp duty tiers for first-time buyers*:
Infographic - Stamp duty tax tiers for first time buyers
Stamp duty tiers for first-time buyers*:
Infographic - Stamp duty tax tiers for first time buyers

* If you buy your home as a first-time buyer for over £500,000 then standard stamp duty tiered rates apply for the entire property value.

So, if you pay £350,000 for your home as a first-time buyer, stamp duty will be calculated like this:

Property price:
£350,000

Portion 1
(£0-£300,000)
0% tax so stamp duty = £0

Portion 2
(£300,000.01-£350,000)
5% tax so stamp duty = £2,500

Total stamp duty owed = £0 + £2,500 = £2,500


Use our first-time buyer stamp duty calculator to work out how much you’ll owe.

Stamp Duty Calculator

Is stamp duty different for second homes?


If you’re buying a second home, a holiday home or a buy-to-let property, you have to pay an extra 3% on each tier of stamp duty.

The only exceptions are if you’re a first-time buyer or you’re buying a property for £40,000 or less – in which case the standard stamp duty rates apply. This higher stamp duty rate also only applies to additional residential property and not to land or commercial property.

The stamp duty tiers are:
Infographic - Stamp duty tax tiers compared with additional property rates
The stamp duty tiers are:
Infographic - Stamp duty tax tiers compared with additional property rates
Stamp duty rate Additional property rate*

* Properties under £40,000 are not subject to the additional stamp duty land tax (SDLT) rates

So, if you’re a buying a second home for £350,000, stamp duty will be calculated like this:

Property price:
£350,000

Portion 1
(£0-£125,000)
3% tax so stamp duty =
£
3,750

Portion 2
(£125,000.01-£250,000)
5% tax so stamp duty =
£
6,250

Portion 3
(£250,000.01-£350,000)
8% tax so stamp duty =
£
8,000

Total stamp duty owed = £3,750 + £6,250 + £8,000 = £18,000


Use our stamp duty calculator for second homes to see how much you’ll have to pay.

Stamp Duty Calculator

In Scotland and Wales?


In Scotland and Wales, the systems are slightly different. Instead of stamp duty, Scotland has land and buildings transaction tax. It’s a lump-sum tax that’s very similar to stamp duty but the tiers and additional property rates are different, as follows:
Infographic - Land and buildings transaction tax tiers compared with additional property rates
In Scotland and Wales, the systems are slightly different. Instead of stamp duty, Scotland has land and buildings transaction tax. It’s a lump-sum tax that’s very similar to stamp duty but the tiers and additional property rates are different, as follows:
Infographic - Land and buildings transaction tax tiers compared with additional property rates
Land and buildings transaction tax rate Additional property rate*

* Properties under £40,000 are not subject to the additional land and buildings transaction rates

In Wales, it’s called land transaction tax and, again, is very similar to stamp duty but with different tiers and rates, as follows:
Infographic - Land traction tax tiers compared with additional property rates
In Wales, it’s called land transaction tax and, again, is very similar to stamp duty but with different tiers and rates, as follows:
Infographic - Land traction tax tiers compared with additional property rates
Land transaction tax rate Additional property rate*

* Properties under £40,000 are not subject to the additional land transaction tax rates


Use our stamp duty calculator to see how much stamp duty you'll need to pay.

Stamp Duty Calculator